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  • September 2018

  • 25

    The Right to Keep and Bear Arms Date: Tuesday, September 25, 2018 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Burr and Burton Academy, Hunter Seminar Room Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    The importance attached to the right to bear arms and the impact of the Second Amendment continue to reverberate, as they have since its adoption in 1791. What is the background of the term 'well-regulated militia'? What was the origin of 'the right to bear arms'? How is it that the United States has an attitude to civilian-owned guns that is so markedly different from all other democratic, industrialized countries? This talk will trace the history of the right to bear arms from inception to the present day.

  • 27

    When Wilderness Was Less Wild: The Story Behind Lye Brook Wilderness Date: Thursday, September 27, 2018 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Burr and Burton Academy, Hunter Seminar Room Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    Following the federal Wilderness Act of 1964, an additional 15 Eastern U.S. properties were added in 1975, one of which was our own Lye Brook Wilderness. Running from Manchester to Sunderland, its 18,000 acres once hosted logging camps, charcoaling operations, and Rich Lumber Company’s Lye Brook Railroad. This talk will discuss Lye Brook's past, present and future.

  • October 2018

  • 18

    Capital Punishment in Ancient Rome Date: Thursday, October 18, 2018 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Burr and Burton Academy, Hunter Seminar Room Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    This lecture consists of an overview of ancient capital punishments in Rome, from the end of the monarchy to the early centuries of the empire. The historical analysis will focus on the religious, legal, and societal dynamics of various methods of execution.

  • November 2018

  • 01

    Rescue and Resistance: Aid for Persecuted Jews in Nazi Occupied Latvia, Lithuania and Belarus Date: Thursday, November 1, 2018 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Burr and Burton Academy, Hunter Seminar Room Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    The Holocaust sparked different reactions among the gentile population. Along with collaborators and bystanders, there was a minority of individuals who did not accept the crime happening in front of their eyes. This presentation discusses motivation, background and networking of those who aided and rescued Jews. They acted at risk of their own life and that of their families under the harsh conditions of Nazi occupation policy in Eastern Europe. The patterns of aid and rescue often required the initiatives of both the helpers and the Jews. Even when individuals decided to act on their own – independent from any organized underground movement – aid and rescue could be regarded as resistance to the Nazi regime.

  • 13

    Greenland’s North Pole Legacy – Black, White and Eskimo Date: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 Time: 5:30 pm-7:00 pm Location: Burr and Burton Academy, Hunter Seminar Room Fee: $15 in advance; $20 at the door

    Robert Peary and his African-American partner Matthew Henson spent nearly three decades in NW Greenland researching how to get to the North Pole. Following their alleged conquest of the Pole in 1909, Peary was honored as a national hero while Henson was ignored. While in Greenland, Peary and Henson did a little procreating on the side. Their descendants have lived there since. They were “discovered” by a Harvard professor in 1986 and reunited with their American “cousins”. National Geographic sent a film crew to document the presentation of a replica of the Society’s Hubbard Medal, which had been awarded posthumously to Henson to one of Henson’s grandsons. During this presentation, selections from the resulting nationally televised video featuring Inuit culture, seal hunting, and some really wild dogsledding will be shown.